Equine, Horse & Rider

Case Study: The unexpected project of Richie

At the end of last year an unexpected addition joined the herd in the form of Richie. Richie is an 8 year old Irish Sport Horse with some Belgium warmblood. He is 16.3hh with lovely big round hooves, wide chest and deceitfully short in his back. Richie is a sweet natured gelding that is easy to handle and very friendly. He is very food orientated which should help with any training undertaken. Richie is a lovely individual to be around.

So the big question is how Richie came to join the herd? Richie was on a hunt yard but showed signs of not coping, this was in the form of ditching riders by putting the brakes on and dropping the shoulder. He also did this in schools. As far as I know Richie had done some showjumping in Ireland and possibly hunting before coming over to England to hunt. Richie was given a last chance at the hunt yard but started to show signs of not coping again. As a result he was sent back to his owner. Due to a number of circumstances Richie came to join the herd.

Original Plan

So the plan was to take things slow with Richie, allow him to settle into herd life. He had already had a couple of months off with his owner but I felt the extra time would allow Richie to open up, relax and be a horse.

It was planned in the new year (2 months time), that ground work would be started. With very basic in hand work such as walking, poles, walking backwards, stepping under with hind quarters, core exercises (belly lifts, pelvic tucks) and stretching. Lunging would be introduced gradually starting with walking and then introducing small amounts of trot and eventually canter over 6 weeks. During this time Richie would be measured and fitted for a saddle to then start ridden work. Ridden work would start very basic with walking for 5 min and then gradually adding small amounts of trot and pole work. This is when the plan hugely depends on how Richie is responding and will be reviewed at this point.

How the Plan has gone so far

As everyone knows things do not always go to plan when working with horses, however Richie has shown he wants to be doing something. I came to this conclusion due to a number of things. Richie was very interested in the work the other horses were doing. He got to the point that he would come and join in by jumping out of his paddock. When I did start basic ground work he was very engaged to the point that when I took him back to his paddock he still wanted to continue. As a result the original plan was implemented a month earlier than planned. Ground work went well and lunging was introduced however it soon came apparent that Richie was very good on one rein but was very confused as to what he is meant to do on the other. So far Richie has shown that he is highly engaged but there are moments that he doesn’t know what is being asked of him. The fact that we don’t have a fixed timescale to get Richie to being a regular hacked, schooled or jumped horse means that we can give him the time to process things and understand what we are asking of him.

Trust

One of the key elements I want to work with Richie on is trust. I want to build a bond that allows him to trust me and for him to want to look after his rider. I am trying to create an environment were he can express his emotions without repercussions or having to fit in with a timetable. In a hope that we can take the stress response away. The main problem with Richie is that we don’t know what triggered his previous behaviour. We don’t know whether there was something specific that caused him to offload his rider or whether it was an accumulation of stress due to not being able to cope with his job. As a result I have stripped things right back to be as natural an environment as possible. He is turned out 24/7 with a small mixed herd. He is not clipped and is barefoot. He is handled every day but in a manner that is not demanding anything of him. He does get hard feed twice a day as do other herd members and hayed morning and evening. The herd have free range of about 8 acres. I regularly watch how the herd interacts and Richie plays with the others, participates in mutual grooming and communally sleeps when the others do. Richie regularly lies down to sleep. Richie also likes to watch over the two foals that have recently joined the herd and are currently in an adjoining paddock.

Watch this space for future updates on Richie’s progress.

Equine, Horse & Rider, Injury Management

Why get your horse massaged?

When I tell people that I am qualified to massage both humans and horses, I often get asked, “Why would you massage a horse?” I never get asked, “Why massage a human?” As a result I often want to throw back, “Why wouldn’t you get your horse massaged?” Let’s have a closer look.

I believe that I don’t get asked, “Why massage a human?” Due to the ability for people to understand how our body feels and are able to empathise with others when they feel stiff and in pain. I think sometimes humans forget that horses can feel discomfort like people do, and below are a few factors which can affect horses.

Horses are not designed to be ridden

Historically horses have been domesticated by humans for a number of jobs over hundreds of years. Horses were not put here just for human use and as a result have to adapt to the demands humans place on them. A horse needs to be broken in slowly and gently to allow adaptations to occur especially in the back. The vertebral column especially the base of the neck are the last areas of the horse to mature. By this, I mean the growth plates are the last to fuse. As a result skeletal maturation doesn’t occur until at least five and half years old. Further to this if your horse is taller, long in the neck and a gelding then fusion can take longer. You may be looking at eight years old before this has all occurred. Therefore, looking after the musculoskeletal spine is paramount too developing a strong and enduring horse for the future. Conformation of a horse can also play a role in developing tightness and stiffness, as certain conformations will predispose a horse to experience certain mechanical stressors. For instance, a horse with a long neck may experience more muscle soreness in the shoulder and neck, as they will have to work harder to stabilise. Regular massage, stretching, and exercises can help a horse to adapt, as they are developing and allow them to grow strong, flexible and supple.

Demands

Humans demand quite a bit from horses. Some have a job such as military and police horses. Others are competed at high levels in dressage, eventing, endurance, racing, team chasing and show jumping to name a few. All of these disciplines work the horse physically and mentally very hard, and as a result aches, tightness, and injuries do occur. A high performance human athlete wouldn’t go through a heavy training period without having regular massage, or treatment to help them train better and reduce the risk of injury. So why would we ask a horse too?

While I have discussed high performing horses all horses being ridden can benefit from massages. While they might not have the high demands placed on them as high perfuming horses do, they still get ridden regularly even at low level competition and as a result experience aches and pains. Horses also have to deal with us humans. We are not always the fittest or most balanced and horses have to compensate. More often than not if a human is stiff on their right side so will your horse. Both horse and rider receiving treatment at a similar time can help the partnership hugely. Imbalances and stiffness can be addressed as a whole entity rather than separate allowing progression to be more rapid and in tune. By having your horse massaged means you can have one as well.

Field, stable and
ridden antics

Horses like to have a frolic around the field with friends or solo and as a result can slip and pull muscles like humans can. This can also occur from spooking and isn’t just limited to the field but when ridden as well. Massage can help horses recover from soft tissue injuries, even impact injuries like a kick, where massage techniques and taping can be employed. Horses that are regularly stabled due to weather or other circumstances like box rest can also suffer sore muscles from repetitive actions like feeding from a hay net. They can experience fluid retention in their limbs due to reduced movement and as a result can feel stiff. Massaging can help relieve muscle soreness and fluid retention but can also relax a stabled horse and give them something different in their daily routine.

Old and young horses

Old horses, like older people suffer aches and pains as they age. Some of this can be due to arthritic changes in joins, a reduced healing rate or cellular turnover, changes in circulation and other health conditions. Massage can help increase mobility in joints, improve circulation and help with pain management making an old horse feel better.

While it wouldn’t be thought that young horses would experience aches and pains they do, but not in the same way an elderly horse might. Young horses are growing rapidly and may experience muscle ache or other problems associated with being young and growing. A young horse also has to adapt to the demands being placed on it such as accommodating a rider, which it has not experienced in its early years. The horse may then be expected to be ridden in an outline and jumped, which it needs time to adapt. Also a young horse is still growing when this is all going on so they need to get used to their own bodies. During all of this young horses can experience discomfort, stiffness, and tight muscles. Massage can help prevent compensatory movement, avoidance behaviour and finally injury.

Past injuries

Unless you have had your horse since a foal you won’t know all its history. As a result there are past injuries that may be still affecting your horse. When I got my current horse and had a bodyworker come and treat him, she said that he had probably had a fall at some point, perhaps into a ditch! It wasn’t until I had the opportunity to chat to a past owner that she confirmed this is exactly what happened. As a result of having a bodyworker (massage therapist) we were able to release this tension and work towards building up his strength. A few years on you wouldn’t know this had happened. Massage can help a great deal towards allowing a horse to function at a better capacity after an injury, as well as help prevent further injuries or compensatory movements. Through massage certain muscles can be released allowing other muscles to be strengthened, and further helping your horse to perform to their potential, be it a happy hacker or a top class event horse.

Well Being

Humans find massage relaxing, so why wouldn’t a horse! More often than not horses completley zone out when experiencing a massage. They relax, some even go to sleep. It allows them time out and a moment to recharge. Your horse will appreciate regular massages and you may find that unwanted behaviours may diminish, due to being relaxed and removing any discomfort. Horses tend to not be naughty in nature and often behaviours occur due to pain. I will admit some horses do have a sense of humour and you could deem this as naughty, but there is a big difference between this and avoiding doing something because it is sore. Horses can also be very good at hiding pain, due to being a pray animal and not wanting to show outward signs to a predator. This means as owners we have to get very good at reading the signs. A regular massage can help prevent this from happening and help your horses well being.

Horses are all very different, they experience muscle tightness and discomfort in different areas and ways, due to age, conformation, injuries, jobs, health conditions and environment. However, to reduce this and allow horses to perform better, in comfort and enjoy it, we can give them regular bodywork sessions. This can be a combination of massage, exercises, stretches, tape, acupressure and many more to allow horses to relax, release and reduce discomfort. Empowering horses to move more freely and naturally.